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([personal profile] jhameia Jun. 22nd, 2017 12:41 am)
Have stayed at completely different places in the last three days: Corral Creek Cabins was in the mountains right by Kern River, then Sequoia Riverfront Cabins was a weird place which WAS right by a river, not across the road from one, and its front desk was a general store about a mile away, and now in a beachfront resort in San Simeon. My brother has been driving us a lot. We've been radio-surfing a lot.

Tomorrow we'll head to Santa Cruz, and hit up Monterey on the way, and after a couple of nights in Santa Cruz, we'll go to San Francisco.

I'm really liking the beachfront place. The front office gave us two rooms, one with a view of the ocean downstairs, and one upstairs with a fireplace. And I snagged the downstairs immediately because I wanted to work at a desk with a view of the sea. It's not been working, of course, because I spent most of the evening texting with A instead of working. But hope spring eternal?? We don't have to check out until noon anyway.
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jhameia: ME! (Default)
([personal profile] jhameia Jun. 17th, 2017 11:50 pm)
well.... commencement happened, I looked banging, I went #7 in line and stayed the rest of the THREE GODDAMN HOURS HOLY SCHNYKIES

Nalo was there to hood one of my friends, yay!

I hoped to get into the Eaton stacks to get pictures of myself in full regalia with my books in the stacks, but oh well. Some other time, maybe.

My parents are annoying but what else is new. But now they have heard from professors in my department how awesome I am, so yay.

We are going to Joshua Tree and Sequoia National Forest (I think) (some of part that range) and then to Santa Cruz and then to San Francisco.

I have worn makeup twice in three days and my face feels very tired >_>

Gonna bring my computer with me on the off chance that I can keep working on the diss while I'm on the road. Wishes and dreams and stuff.

Gotta decide if I wanna take the 10pm Bolt Bus or an 11pm Greyhound. I guess in the long run it doesn't matter? Gonna go with the cheaper option.
jadelennox: Demonic Tutor, Jadelennox: my Magic card (demonic tutor)
([personal profile] jadelennox Jun. 16th, 2017 02:50 pm)
Don't give stuff.

When official voices for a charity or a cause ask for stuff, you can give stuff. Give what they request, only what they request, and in good condition. Don't give unwashed or unfolded clothes. Don't give expired or open food. Don't dump and run.

Give money. Give time. Give votes. And if you know they want your stuff, give stuff.

After Hurricane Katrina, waterlogged schools full of developing mold were inundated with donations -- of textbooks from the 1960s, torn paperbacks nobody wanted, and old national geographics. Then it became their problem to throw away someone else's unwanted stuff.

Don't make suffering people the solution to your problems about not wanting to throw unusable clothes in the trash. Don't make them the repository of your helpless survivor's guilt.

From The Guardian's liveblog of Grenfell Tower aftermath:
He added: “I haven’t seen this much aid out of a war zone, but the council just hasn’t stepped in. There is too much in the way of donations. But the problem is how to get it to the right people, and what you do with the surplus. One man, I’m sure with the best of intention, left a massive box full of milk - and now volunteers have to figure out what to do with a box of gone-off milk.”


From twitter user [twitter.com profile] pastelchalk:


We feel bad throwing things away. Find a charity that actively wants your things, or suck it up. We feel bad being okay when disasters happen. Go volunteer to help, or become an activist for those trying to prevent similar tragedies, or write a check, or suck it up. The best of intentions and a fiver will buy you a cup of coffee.
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([personal profile] jhameia Jun. 13th, 2017 09:40 am)
Besides the text message that made me happy last night, I also found that the grad advisor of my department had sent out a mass-email earlier in the evening congratulation me for Trials by Whiteness (followed by a string of congratulatory emails from others in the department) and that I just got a story acceptance.

I'm gonna cook and clean today, and finish a short story before I bang on the diss again. YL is coming over for dinner so I'm making bak kut teh (which she's never had!! and she clearly needs it!!!).
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(Context: my roof appears to have sprung a leak, probably many months ago, but the vaguaries of roof-spaces and gravity have made the problem visible just recently. I'm awaiting a builder but today the carpet could no longer be ignored.)

1. Carpet that has shown itself capable of growing mould is probably also capable of growing other fungi, such as mushrooms.

I am told on good authority (ie one of my siblings) that fluorescent mushrooms growing in one's house is a Very Bad Thing. Fortunately, the mushrooms growing in my carpet were not fluorescent. If they had been fluorescent I might have noticed them earlier, because at this time of year I leave the house when it's still dark and get home after it's darkened again so only see things by daylight during the weekends. Thus, this morning I discovered mushrooms growing in my carpet that, while not fluorescent, did not look very edible either.

2. A screwdriver (to pry up the first carpet nail) and thereafter some sturdy pliers (to grip and pull) are a pretty decent way to rip up dry carpet.

There is no decent way to rip up rotten carpet. You still probably can't beat pliers but at a certain point of rotten they're just tearing it apart a few chunks or threads at a time.

3. Sufficiently thin carpet and underlay is indistinguishable from thin carpet.

When I bought the house, the inspection report commented on the thin carpet and lack of underlay. I've been meaning for years to get new carpet and underlay and revel in luxury but first I had to get earthquake repairs finished, and then I've been hunting for some decent carpet in a colour other than grey or beige (that's a rant for another day), and now fixing the roof and whatever wood has rotted in the process is probably going to take priority. But anyway.

Joke's on the house inspector, because when I started ripping up the rotten carpet it turned out there was too underlay, just for some reason it was cut an inch away from the walls.

4. Damp wool carpet smells bad. Rotten wool carpet smells worse. Fungi-ridden carpet smells even worse[1]. But if you want to smell the worst thing of all, that comes when you start ripping it all up.

Yes, I wore a face mask. It was still foul. I think the rotten underlay was even worse than the rotten carpet.

5. The best way to cut through carpet is with a craft knife.

I tried scissors but they didn't seem keen on it and I wasn't keen on dulling my good fabric scissors. But Dad suggested a knife and that cut through both the carpet and the underlay like soft butter.


Bonus discovery: a previous owner appears to have laid the kitchen lino on top of the old kitchen lino. I can only see the edge of the latter, but it appears to be peak 1970s. (Like my carpet, in fact. I actually quite like my carpet, apart from it being threadbare and also now missing a large chunk due to rot and mushrooms. It was good Axminster carpet; not this but very similar to this. --Oh hey, maybe if I can't find any coloured carpet in New Zealand I could simply import some carpet at great expense from the UK, because this one is pretty close to what I'd really like.)

Conclusion: Please let it not rain significantly before I can get the builder to come and figure out what's going on up there. <weep>

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[1] Linguistic sidebar: Is it universal with adjectives to have the absolute ('bad'), the comparative ('worse'), and the superlative ('worst')? I'm wondering because lots of languages have three degrees of distance (Spanish: aquí, allí, allá; Māori: tēnei, tēnā, tērā; even English used to have here, there, yonder) but then there's occasional glorious exceptions like Malagasy which has seven. So now I'm imagining a language with multiple degrees of comparison, kind of like: bad > worse > worser > worst > worstest. Ripping up rotten underlay is the worstest.
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([personal profile] rem Jun. 9th, 2017 08:47 pm)

Adam Christopher's Standard Hollywood Depravity is the latest in the Ray Electromatic series. Length-wise, it's about twice as long as "Brisk Money" but half as long as Made to Kill.

Ray is at a nightclub, watching dancers as well as watching other people watch dancers. There are many watchers, and many watched, and many wearing watches. Ray's current job involves someone at the nightclub, with between the dancing, it's hard to find the right time and place to take care of it. But when his target becomes his accomplice, things get complicated.

As with the previous book, I love the dialogues between Ray and Ada:

"I think I know where Tieri's man is."

"Okay."

"He's in the bathroom."

"Nature's call, Ray, nature's call. Am I going to have to teach you about human biology now?"

"I know enough about human biology to know that they tend to leak red stuff when they get punctured."

"Oh," said Ada. "He's not coming out of the bathroom, is he, Ray?"

"He is not."

The way Ray's job worked out this time around makes me suspect that this book is setting up events for the next book, the same way "Brisk Money" set things up for Made to Kill. I can't wait to find out what happens.

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